The Kiss of Medusa and Trauma's Return: Thought-Play (5)

Perhaps what so threatens the boy-child is the threat delivered by the sight of a split, a cleft, a tear or rift, that separates him irrevocably from the Mother, and from all that the Mother means to him. That is, perhaps what really threatens the little “man” so is the vision of a yawning gap between himself and all who are like him, most definitely including the Father, on the one side, and the Mother and all who are like her, on the other. 

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The Kiss of Medusa and Trauma's Return: Thought-Play (4)

Our automatic reaction to what we perceive as dreadful, threatening, or monstrous is apotropaic. We try to drive the monster away, fleeing from it—combining fight against it with flight from it, in the common “fight-or-flight” reaction to what engenders fear in us. Thus did one flee from Medusa, as one fled from all three Gorgons of Greek myth. Unfortunately—at least it strikes us at first as a misfortune, and continues so to strike us for a very long while—Medusa refuses to be avoided.

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The Kiss of Medusa and Trauma's Return: Thought-Play (2)

The wisdom of the desert hermits is that the only effective response to acedia, the devil of boredom that prowls at noon, is not to try to divert ourselves from it, in an unfulfilled, unfulfilled-able, and ultimately counter-productive—and ultimately magical—endeavor to ward it off and keep it away. Rather, it is to accept it, as one accepts a gift, and to remain with it. It is to let it wash over one, relaxing into it instead of stiffening against it in. 

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The Kiss of Medusa and Trauma’s Return: Thought-Play (1)

Apotropaic means “designed to avert evil” (from Greek apo-, “away from,” plus trepein, “to turn”). Acts so designed arise from the fear that evil—or at least what we experience as evil—evokes. To experience some thing or occurrence as evil is to experience it as injurious, dangerous, threatening. We flee from what we experience as evil, flee from it either by moving away from it, or by putting up defenses against it, to ward it off, deflect it, avert it (literally, “turn it aside”).

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In Defense of Apathy (2)

The mere labeling of all non-voters as apathetic—in its dominant contemporary meaning of indolent, lazy, or just not caring—already reinforces the idea that one is doing something important by voting, and acting irresponsibly by not doing so. However, more than one author has cogently argued that encouraging the public to think in such an automatic pro-voting way actually supports a power system that has rigged the outcome of any election in advance.

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In Defense of Apathy (1)

Abstaining in deliberate protest does not mean that one does not care about the issues that are themselves at the root of politics and political decisions. Rather it is an expression of caring about those very issues, even caring intensely—so intensely that one refuses to participate in any process that reduces them all to no more than the equivalent of lines in a farce. Deliberately refusing to vote for such a principled reason reflects anything but apathy, in the dominant contemporary sense. 

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Language Theft and the Enclosure of the Commons (2)

There are two fundamentally different senses of what can be called “land-use.” In one of those senses, to use the land is precisely to exploit it. An altogether different sense of use does not exploit the land, draining it of all its own wealth, but instead cultivates the land, to further enrich it.

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